RESEARCH TEAM

Primary Investigator

A/Prof Thomas Carlson

Primary Investigator

A/Prof Thomas Carlson research interests are visual object recognition and multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) methods. He completed his Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Minnesota in 2004 under the supervision of Profs Sheng He and Paul Schrater. Following his PhD, he has had appointments at Harvard, University of Maryland, and Macquarie University. In 2016, A/Prof Carlson moved to Sydney University to start the Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory.  


Email: thomas.carlson@sydney.edu.au

Twitter: @CompCogNeuro 

Google Scholar: Link

University webpage: Link


Postdoctoral Researcher

Dr Amanda Robinson

Postdoctoral Researcher

Dr Amanda Robinson is an ARC DECRA Fellow at the University of Sydney with expertise in perception and attention, specifically relating to object perception. She received her PhD from the Queensland Brain Institute at The University of Queensland for research on olfactory-visual integration. After a postdoc with Prof Marlene Behrmann at Carnegie Mellon University, Dr Robinson returned to Australia to join the Sydney Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Lab. Dr Robinson uses EEG, MEG and fMRI with computational methods to uncover the spatiotemporal dynamics of perceptual processing.


Email: amanda.robinson@sydney.edu.au  

Twitter: @amandarob10

Google Scholar: Link

University webpage: Link 

PhD Student

Roy Raskolnikov

PhD Student

Roy Raskolnikov is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in the Sydney Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Lab. He completed his Bachelor’s degree in Science at the University of Sydney, majoring in Psychology and Neuroscience. His Masters thesis focused on using virtual reality to assess human spatial navigation, under the supervision of Dr Ian Johnston. Roy’s research focuses on how people process social cues.  

 

Email: bseg7214@uni.sydney.edu.au


PhD Student

Alex Sulfaro

PhD Student

Alex Sulfaro is currently a PhD candidate in the lab. Alex graduated from a Bachelor of Advanced Science at UNSW, majoring in chemistry and neuroscience. He was awarded First-Class Honours for his project in synthetic organic chemistry, making improved analogues of neuroactive drugs. His research currently focuses on the neural mechanisms that distinguish both visual and auditory mental imagery from sensory perception and hallucinations.


Email: alexander.sulfaro@sydney.edu.au

Twitter: @HereForPapers

PhD Student

Sophia Shatek

PhD Student

Sophia Shatek is a currently working on research as part of a PhD program. Sophia completed a Bachelor of Science (Advanced), majoring in psychology and neuroscience. She received first class honours for her project in the Sydney Computational Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, investigating mental imagery with EEG. Her current research looks at concept development across the lifespan.

 

Email: sophia.shatek@sydney.edu.au

Twitter: @ShatekSophia


Masters Student

Ivy Zhou

Masters Student

Ivy completed her Honours degree in the group investigating how concept representations vary across languages. She is now a Masters student studying cross-linguistic conceptual representation in English and Chinese Mandarin speakers.


Email: izho0104@uni.sydney.edu.au

 

 

ALUMNI

Christopher Whyte

Alumnus

Christopher Whyte conducted research in the group as part of his Master’s degree, investigating how multi-variate pattern analysis techniques can provide insight into perceptual processing, particularly in predictive coding and visual awareness. He completed his Bachelor’s degree in Science, with a major in cognitive and brain sciences, and a minor in philosophy.  

 

Twitter: @chrisjackwhyte

Patrick Engeler

Alumnus

Patrick previously conducted a research project in the lab as part of his Masters thesis. His research focuses on invariant object recognition. Patrick graduated from a Bachelor of Science, majoring in biomedicine.

Dr Tijl Grootswagers

Alumnus

Dr Tijl Grootswagers is an early career researcher  and  an expert  in  multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), or “brain  decoding”, methods. Dr Grootswagers completed his Ph.D. at Macquarie University, developing his expertise in the application of MVPA to MEG data. He is the author of a tutorial article published in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience that provides guidelines and standards for MEG decoding. He has made extensive use of MVPA methods, and mainly applied them to the domain of visual object recognition. He has also been among the pioneers introducing the application of MVPA to MEG in several other domains, such as emotion representation, number recognition, and colour processing. Tijl is now a Vice Chancellor's Research Fellow in Cognitive Neuroscience at the MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development at Western Sydney University.

 

Website: tijl.github.io 

Twitter: @TGrootswagers 

Google Scholar: Link

Lina Teichmann

Alumnus

Dr Lina Teichmann's PhD work focused on understanding how conceptual knowledge is integrated with sensory information to shape the way we perceive the world. She used MEG combined with multivariate pattern analyses (MVPA) to disentangle brain activity associated with visual and conceptual aspects of number and object processing. Her work gave insights into the complexities of visual perception and its dependency on prior knowledge 

  

Twitter: @lina_teichmann